Sony a6000 vs a6100: Choosing Entry-Level Mirrorless Camera

Last Updated on

Are you looking for the entry-level mirrorless camera but struggling to decide between the Sony a6000 vs a6100? Then this article will help you to make the right decision.

Sony a6000 vs a6100: Choosing Entry Level Mirrorless Camera

The Sony a6000 was released in 2014, and it became the most sold mirrorless camera model. It is probably the most important camera model from a mirrorless adoption perspective as it kicked things off not only for Sony but for mirrorless cameras in general. 

In the last couple of years, Sony released several models to the a6xxx line with much better specs and higher price tag. The a6100 is the first to feel like a real replacement for the a6000 as it is similar in size, specs, and price. 

The a6100 was released 5 years after the a6000, but Sony is still selling the a6000 at a lower price, so is the upgrade worth the extra money? 

First, let’s take a look at the similarities and differences between these two cameras.

Sony Alpha a6000 Mirrorless Digital Camera 24.3 MP SLR Camera with 3.0-Inch LCD - Body Only (Black)
Sony Alpha A6100 Mirrorless Camera
Sony a6000
Sony a6100
Sensor:
24Mp
24Mp
Continuous Shooting:
11 fps
11 fps
In-Body Stabilization:
No
No
EVF Resolution:
1440K
1440K
WiFi:
Yes
Yes
GPS:
No
No
Built-in Flash:
Yes
Yes
ISO Range:
100 to 25600
100 to 32000
Video Resolution:
1920 x 1080
3840 x 2160
Focus Points:
179
425
Microphone Port:
No
Yes
Touch Screen:
No
Yes
Bluetooth:
No
Yes
Intervalometer:
No
Yes
Battery Life
360
420
Weight:
344g
396g
Sony Alpha a6000 Mirrorless Digital Camera 24.3 MP SLR Camera with 3.0-Inch LCD - Body Only (Black)
Sony a6000
Sensor:
24Mp
Continuous Shooting:
11 fps
In-Body Stabilization:
No
EVF Resolution:
1440K
WiFi:
Yes
GPS:
No
Built-in Flash:
Yes
ISO Range:
100 to 25600
Video Resolution:
1920 x 1080
Focus Points:
179
Microphone Port:
No
Touch Screen:
No
Bluetooth:
No
Intervalometer:
No
Battery Life
360
Weight:
344g
Sony Alpha A6100 Mirrorless Camera
Sony a6100
Sensor:
24Mp
Continuous Shooting:
11 fps
In-Body Stabilization:
No
EVF Resolution:
1440K
WiFi:
Yes
GPS:
No
Built-in Flash:
Yes
ISO Range:
100 to 32000
Video Resolution:
3840 x 2160
Focus Points:
425
Microphone Port:
Yes
Touch Screen:
Yes
Bluetooth:
Yes
Intervalometer:
Yes
Battery Life
420
Weight:
396g

Sony a6000 vs a6100 Main Similarities

Resolution

Both the a6000 and the a6100 are APS-C format cameras with approximately 24 megapixels (to get precise the a6000 has 24.3mp, and the a6100 has 24.2mp). Both cameras have pretty much the same resolution, but the newer a6100 has more processing power and produces 16-bit images. It means a little more detailed photos for the a6100. 

Speed

The a6000 and a6100 both shoot 11 frames per second in burst mode. They also both have the same shutter speed range, 1/4000 to 30 seconds.

Looks

These cameras are almost identical physically. 

The button layout is the same, and each has just one sd card slot. The a6100 is slightly deeper and, as such, weighs 396 grams while the a6000 weighs in at 344 grams. 

Both cameras have a length and width of 120 x 66.9mm.

Connectivity

Both cameras have WiFi and NFC connectivity for communicating with your smartphone. They also each have a USB 2.0 and micro HDMI port. 

The a6100 comes with Bluetooth. But with WiFi and NFC available in both cameras, this doesn’t make much of a difference.

Shot with Sony a6000

Sony a6100 vs a6000 Main Differences

Price

The a6000, being 6 years old, has dropped down in price considerably and can now be had for a bargain. This alone makes it a very attractive option, especially for beginners. 

The a6100 is as you would imagine more expensive but not by that much. The a6100 is still aimed at beginners, so it has been priced to reflect that, but you will have to fork out a couple of hundred more dollars.

Auto Focus

Sony’s autofocus technology is legendary in the camera world, and the newer a6100 benefits from the company’s recent advances. 

Related: Sony a6000 Battery Life and How to Charge it

The focus tracking has significantly improved in the a6100, which is perfect for moving subjects. It also has real-time Eye Auto Focus, which now works with both humans and animals as opposed to the A6000’s which only works with people. 

Video

The a6100 comes with much-improved video specs. 

The a6000 shoots Full HD (1080p) up to 50 or 60fps. The A6100 ramps this up to 4K video up to 30fps, and in 1080p, it can record up to 120fps for slow motion. 

The a6100 also has a 3.5mm microphone input and an HDMI output so you can rig a microphone and monitor and record straight to camera. The a6000 lacks both of these features.

Timelapse

The A6000 made timelapse a bit of a chore; you had to download and pay for a separate app. 

5 years later, Sony has a built-in intervalometer in the A6100 as with most of their newer cameras. The a6100 allows you to preview the time-lapse in-camera as well.

LCD Screen

The LCD a6000 tilts out to 90 degrees, whereas the a6100 makes it to 180 degrees. It will come in handy for selfies or vlogging but is not a major issue for regular photographers. 

The a6100 also comes with touch screen capabilities, which is excellent for selecting focus areas.

ISO

The a6000 has an ISO range of 100 to 25600, and the a6100 goes up to 32000. It makes the a6100 a little better in low light situations but is not a significant upgrade. Both cameras perform well in low light shooting.

Shot with Sony a6000

So Should you upgrade? 

If you already own the a6000, it does not make sense to upgrade to 6100. It just doesn’t give enough of a step up. 

If you are looking to replace your a6000 with a more capable model, go for something like the higher level a6400 or a6600, which will give you a more substantial upgrade. To go from the a6000 to a6100 would leave you feeling the need to upgrade again soon.

If you are looking for your first camera, I would recommend that you go for the a6100 as the a6000, while still a great camera, is 6 years old and only getting older! 

The newer a6100 benefits from 5 years of Sony advances in technology and should take a little longer to become outdated. With the a6000, you will be purchasing an already outdated camera.

What about Lenses?

It can be enticing to purchase a camera with lenses as a kit bundle. But Sony kit lenses are notoriously poor compared to other manufacturers, so I would recommend purchasing the camera as a body only. 

You can then easily find inexpensive and good quality lenses either from Sony or from third party companies such as Tamron, Tokina or Sigma.

If you are switching from another system like Canon or Nikon, then you can save yourself some money and hassle by getting a lens adaptor that will allow you to use your lenses on your new Sony camera. 

For beginners, you only really need one lens to start. Here you can find my lens recommendations for the Sony a6000 and a6100 cameras: Best Lenses for the Sony a6000 and a6100

What to Read Next:

>