How to Weather Seal Your Camera For Under 1 Dollar

For years, I’ve been dreaming about having a weather sealed camera. But, every time I began the process of selecting a new camera, weather sealing became a much lower priority on my list compared to the quality of the sensor, other essential features and, of course, the price.

Photography Tip: How to Weather Seal Your Camera For Under 1 Dollar

 

Another factor among these that also played a large role is the fact that weather sealing is not something that is needed on a daily basis.At the same time, I always regretted not having weather sealing when I was hiking in some beautiful location and was not able to capture it because of rain.

At the same time, I always regretted not having weather sealing when I was hiking in some beautiful location and was not able to capture it because of rain.

If you follow my blog you probably already know that a few months ago I switched from a Canon DSLR to a Sony Mirrorless (Top Reason Why I Switched from Canon to Sony). Once again, I found myself with a brand new Sony A6000 camera, which I really like, but it does not have a weather sealing feature.

When I was planning my January trip to Hawaii , I knew that rain could be a potential problem every day of my short trip and, because of this, I started to explore some options and hacks on how to protect my camera, at least temporarily. After I tested a few options, I settled on the one that seemed the simplest and the cheapest.

The day that I tested my solution the first time in a real-life scenario of travel photography, I woke up at 4am in Honolulu, drove to the opposite coast of O’ahu island, and hiked in complete darkness on the Lanikai Pillbox Trail While I was waiting for the sunrise, it started to rain, but I was ready. I used a large Ziploc bag to protect the camera and lens. I made two holes with my finger, one for the lens, and another for the EVF (Electronic View Finder).

I used a lens hood to attach the bag to the front of the lens and removable EVF rubber eyecup to keep it in place at the back of the camera body.

In total, it took me probably one minute and cost me less than a dollar.

 

 

Deconstructing Featured Photo

Below is the photo I took using my weather sealing hack in a pretty strong tropical rain.

 

Camera: Sony a6000
Lens: Sony 10-18
Focal Length: 18mm
ISO: 100
Aperture: F7.1
Bracketing: 3 shots (-1, 0, +1 )
Tripod: FEISOL Tournament CT-3442  – Check my FEISOL Tournament CT-3442 Review.
Ballhead: FEISOL CB-40D

Processing: Lightroom Preset Based Workflow

Lightroom: import, tagging, preset based processing (Natural preset from Landscape Collection)
Photoshop: contrast, color correction.

Photoshop Plugins: 

Archiving: I save all my photos as JPEG (quality: 100%) at full resolution and with the help of the Lightroom plugin, I synchronized them with my portfolio on SmugMug for safekeeping, sharing, image hosting and online sales.

Do not forget that my FREE Lightroom Preset Collection is always free for all subscribers to my newsletter.
  • hi, VIktor,
    This is exactly how I weather-proof my camera, too! it works great and you can always have a fresh one handy. I also make sure that I have a uv lens filter on my camera to further help protect the lens from the rain when doing this.
    Have a great day!
    Deb

      • thank you, Vikor. was it because it affected your photos? I sometimes take it off to compare, and then put it right back on because I’m afraid I’m going to hurt my lens lol

        • for me UV filter is the useless piece of equipment I have to put in front of my lens and carry it around.

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